HOME | PUBLISHER | ISSUE 4 (OCTOBER - DECEMBER) 2016 | ACCESS INDEXES FOR ALL VOLUMES

Valid CSS! Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional

PDF|Print Shopping cart for future issues to go here

Free to read online.

HUMANITIES SCIENCE POLITICS

Science, People & Politics ISSN 1751-598x, 25th November, 2016. 18.00 GMT

ALDERLEY PARK FEATURE | 8

The first I learned the MD and I would not meet was when I presented
myself at 8.30 am at the main reception desk labelled, elegantly, Astra
Zeneca. The giant is now a tenant - no longer owner - of some 40 per-
cent of the site, with corporate and significant in vivo research facilities
still present. I gave my name. They had no record I was visiting.

Luckily one of the three flaks who ended up being involved in my visit
overheard my name, presented himself, and helpfully explained my day,
had changed. Instead of the director of scientific services my first inter-
viewee would be Stuart Bowden. Bowden is a 20-year veteran of
Alderley Park, former employee of Zeneca, then Astra Zeneca and now
Alderley Park via, I think, the Manchester Science Partnership. His ex-
pertise is health and safety.

We settled with bottled water and coffee and admired duly Astra
Zeneca's patent wall of fame. I pulled out my brochures and aerial pub-
licity shots collected in July at the trade show attached to Euro Science
Open Forum (ESOF 16).

It was then Bowden and I learned we had a different understanding of
he language and descriptions in some of Alderley's publicity material.
I asked to see Blocks A, B, C, and D, which had all caught my attention
because of their capabilities. Each is described with square footage,
physical location and scientific facilities beneath a photo of the campus
and mere it hugs: for all the world a mini Zurich.

So I could not understand why, if it was fine to take a tour, I could not
see these blocks, seemingly the raison d'etre of Alderley Park. When
Bowden appeared I had thought things were looking up. Now I was less
sure. Not certain what the discrete receptionists of Astra Zeneca made
of all this. They may have been far enough away not to hear what
we were saying. At some stage my overnight luggage and coat disappeared
to some place known to them.

In the meantime I focussed on the Blocks I was hoping to visit. Let us
consider Block A (non-human pathology) located, says its blurb,
in Central Mereside, offering 68,000 square feet of "specialised state of
the art" path lab space. Block C (chemistry and bioscience laboratory
facilities), says the same document, is 58,000 square feet

Continued on page 9...

Issue 4 (October - December), 2016. Volume VII. Science, People & Politics ISSN 1751-598x.

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

CONTENTS

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

P8

P9

P10

P11

P12

P13

P14

P15

P16

P17

P18

P19

P20

P21

Published Friday 25th November, 2016

P23

P24

P25

P26

P27

P28

P29

P30

P31

P32

P33

P34

P35

P36

P37

A print version would additionally have two blank pages, so this version is not routinely for sale as print, unless really wanted.

HTML/CSS by Helen Gavaghan©