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HUMANITIES SCIENCE POLITICS

Science, People & Politics ISSN 1751-598x, 25th November, 2016. 18.00 GMT

FROM BRITISH COURTS | 28

In denying money laundering Mr Amin blamed Mr Ali. He also admitted
on the stand to lying to banks when opening accounts with them, lying
to police and to an insurance company to get cheaper car insurance.

During the trial the Court heard evidence from EBay and PayPal about
setting up accounts with them. At one stage, the PayPal witness, giving
evidence by video link, said PayPal was not in a position to give evi-
dence on behalf of EBay. The prosecution allegation was that hundreds
of thousands of pounds passed through such accounts and linked bank
accounts related to defendants accused of money laundering, and that
it was unclear where much of the money withdrawn as cash had gone.

In relationship to the Trademark infringement charges faced by Mr Ali
the senior in-house counsel for IP enforcement for Nintendo Europe, a
qualified solicitor, and, seperately, the IP enforcement manager for
Sony Europe, both testified in Court to the counterfeit nature of goods
shown to each of them by West Yorkshire police, and which are the
goods for which Mr Ali was found guilty of trademark infringement.

As part of the trial process Nintendo's IP counsel agreed after giving
evidence to examine in more detail samples from those siezed by West
Yorkshire Police from a location in Bradford, West Yorkshire. Mr Imran
Shafi from Exchange Chambers, on behalf of Mr Ali, had queried if the
goods could be reconditioned, and not countefeit.

Later in the trial Mr James Gelsthorpe, also from New Park Court
Chambers, and co-instructed with Mr Donkin by the Crown Prosecution
Service, read out a subsequent report saying that one casing contained
a non-matching printed circuit board, and antenna which shouldn't be with incorrect wiring. The Nintendo report to the Court asserted
unequivocally internal components were not authentic and were added
outside of Nintendo's control.

Both the Nintendo and Sony witnesses were adamant the items they
examined were counterfeit. In evidence on the stand Nintendo's in-
house counsel spoke of charger and packaging as passing off, and said
that the batteries were not part of the Nintendo supply chain.

Continued on page 29...

Issue 4 (October - December), 2016. Volume VII. Science, People & Politics ISSN 1751-598x.

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Published Friday 25th November, 2016

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A print version would additionally have two blank pages, so this version is not routinely for sale as print, unless really wanted.

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