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HUMANITIES SCIENCE POLITICS

Science, People & Politics ISSN 1751-598x, 25th November, 2016. 18.00 GMT

FROM BRITISH COURTS | 27

Dual Shock hand held game controllers. The prosecution said the items
were marked in a way which could make them seem to be carrying
genuine Trademarks.

In total Mr Zaman is found guilty of eight charges. Two as the sole
defendant accused of being in possession of criminal property; one with
Mr Ali of conspiracy to receive stolen goods over a three and a half year
period, and five charges as the co-accused with each of Mr Farooq, Mr
Turner, Mr Ahmed (acquitted) and Mr Wali Khan (acquitted), and with
Mr Amin and Mr Ali.

Mr Zaman chose not to give evidence in his own defence. His honour
checked that Mr Zaman's counsel had fully covered this issue with
his client. Prior to police interviews Mr Zaman had made a short statement,
and then responded no comment.

Throughout the trial Mr Ali denied all knowledge of conspiracy, and of
any crime. He denied any interaction with Mr Zaman in any way after
October 2012, though they have known one another, says Mr Ali, since
became argumentative, prompting the judge to urge him to listen to
the questions, and not to argue. Mr Ali had given the name Mr Imran
rather than his own during dealings with one Queensbury-based busi-
ness (Queensbury is a town midway between Halifax and Bradford), but
there was no suggestion by the prosecution that Mr Ali had used the
name Mr Imran (a nickname, said Mr Ali) with intent to defraud that
business, though it seems he did deceive them as to his true identity.

On the stand Mr Ali made no secret that he had previously been found
guilty of charges related to dishonesty in business, which had resulted
in a five year custodial sentence. He was released in October 2012 on
licence, half way through the sentence, and told the jury during this
trial he had learned his lesson, now has responsibilities, and could not
have done certain things because he was at the time in prison.
Mr Matthew Donkin of New Park Court Chambers, instructed by the
Crown, argued that for a conspiracy to exist it did not matter at what
time an individual entered the conspiracy, providing that the date of
joining fell within a single overall period of alleged conspiracy.

Continued on page 28...

Issue 4 (October - December), 2016. Volume VII. Science, People & Politics ISSN 1751-598x.

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CONTENTS

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Published Friday 25th November, 2016

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A print version would additionally have two blank pages, so this version is not routinely for sale as print, unless really wanted.

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