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Artificial satellites, Astronautics, History

GavaghanCommunications | Source material

SOMETHING NEW UNDER THE SUN, Satellites and the Beginning of the Space Age
Copyright for the book, including research notes, Copernicus/Springer Verlag (New York)

History of artificial satellites
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p259

where). The paper demonstrates Suomi's abilities as a salesman for satellite meteorology.

Chapter thirteen: The Bird's-Eye View

Information about ideas for meteorology satellites in the early 1950s can be found in: RAND's Role in the Evolution of Balloon and Satellite Observation Systems and Related US Space Technology (page 140 and 141), by Merton E. Davies, William R. Harris; and Inquiry into the Feasibility of Weather reconnaissance from a Satellite Vehicle, by S.M. Greenfield and W.W Kellogg. This is an unclassified version of USAF Project RAND Report R-218, April 1951.

An unsigned letter, probably from Thomas Haig or Verner Suomi, talks of the work that the writer and Dave Johnson did toward promoting a single national satellite program in the early 1960s. They were unsuccessful, and both a civilian and military program have since run in parallel. Verner Suomi talks of the duplication he saw (page 147). The writer of the letter to Johnson says of a national program, "I don't think anyone has come close since, and lots of dollars have been wasted as a consequence."

The patent dispute between Hughes and NASA over the spin-scan camera went on for some time. An internal memo from Robert Parent to Verner Suomi of July 8, 1969, outlines the issues and suggests that he and Suomi should put together a chronology in case further action should be taken in future.

Five years later, the dispute was still bubbling along. In a letter dated October 10, 1974, Verner Suomi wrote to Robert Kempf at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. He described when and how he conceived of the idea for the spin-scan camera and what he subsequently did. Suomi asserts that he considers the patent to belong to the U.S. government. The dispute was resolved in NASA's favor.

The report "Space Uses of the Earth's Magnetic Field" (unclassified report) by Ralph B. Hoffman, 1st Lt. USAF, and Thomas O. Haig, Lt. Col. USAF, describes the passive attitude control possible by designing the satellite so that it can take advantage of Earth's magnetic field for attitude control.


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artificial, satellites, astronautics, technology, history, satellites, history, astronautics, astronautics, satellites, history, astronautics, politics.

Page text content checked against original in print by HG on 2nd May, 2013.

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