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Artificial satellites, Astronautics, History

GavaghanCommunications | Source material

SOMETHING NEW UNDER THE SUN, Satellites and the Beginning of the Space Age
Copyright for the book, including research notes, Copernicus/Springer Verlag (New York)

History of artificial satellites
BOOK FOR SALE


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p258

131). An unsigned letter to Dave Johnson dated July 29, 1991, which being from Wisconsin must be from either Thomas Haig or Verner Suomi, says, "Delighted to hear that you are about to set the record straight and tell the whole truth about the early met sat days. I'm especially glad that you are the one who is going to do it, because you are really the only one who knew both the civilian and the military programs from the beginning."

The writer puts his finger on the difficulty with writing about the early meteorological satellite days and makes the case for declassification, saying, "I have no clear idea what is still considered to be classified, and I can't imagine why any of the old program history should still be under wraps except perhaps to hide some old CIA-AF feuding that no-one is interested in anyway."

Information about numerical weather prediction (pages 135 and 136) came from my interviews with Joseph Smagorinsky, director of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey, from 1976 to 1983. Smagorinsky has been involved in meteorology since his days with the Army Air Corps. He joined the meteorology group of the Institute of Advanced Studies in Princeton in 1950. The group made its first numerical weather predictions on the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC);

The beginning of Numerical Weather Prediction, by Joseph Smagorinsky, in Advances in Geophysics 25, p. 3 (1983);

John von Neumann, by Norman Macrae, Pantheon Books (1992).

A variety of publications about the Global Atmosphere Research program (pages 132 and 133) are to be found in the library of the National Academy of Sciences. One, published by the International Council of Scientific Unions and the World Meteorological Organization, provides an introduction to the program. It is No.1 in the GARP Publication senes.

Further, less formal, information about the potential role of satellites in the GARP is to be found in a presentation Verner Suomi made to a symposium in October 1969 (the paper doesn't say which symposium, or


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artificial, satellites, astronautics, technology, history, satellites, history, astronautics, astronautics, satellites, history, astronautics, politics.

Page text content checked against original in print by HG on 2nd May, 2013.

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