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Artificial satellites, Astronautics, History

GavaghanCommunications | Source material

SOMETHING NEW UNDER THE SUN, Satellites and the Beginning of the Space Age
Copyright for the book, including research notes, Copernicus/Springer Verlag (New York)

History of artificial satellites
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The relative importance of written and oral records varies from section to section and even within sections, as does the balance between primary and secondary sources. In chapter one, for example, secondary sources were the only ones I had access to.

Even when there are records, they can be scanty or one-sided. The IGY, for example, is well recorded by the National Academy of Sciences, but the individual scientists, such as Verner Suomi, do not have extensive records. Often, the scientists and technologists were too busy as pioneers to record in detail what they were doing, and posterity was the last thing on their minds.

The NAS archives, which were of importance to the prologue; chapters two, three, and eleven; and to parts of the other sections have been well mined, and others have written extensively of the IGY and its relationship to the subsequent development of space science in the U.S. My angle was to explore the same material for the seeds of space technology and of application satellites.

Both oral and written primary sources are of equal importance to the navigation section. The pre-Transit chapters were possible only because of long and repeated interviews, while the chapters on Transit were possible only because of the material in APL's archives.

The meteorology section is based on interviews, a few primary sources, and secondary sources. It provides the clearest example of the emergence of application satellites from the IGY. But access to declassified primary sources will eventually make the history of meteorology satellites much more complete.

The communication section is the most heavily based on primary source written records, supplemented with a few interviews.

The ePage selector concept, and its template, was independently devised, coded and copyrighted in basic html and physically integrated into pages by Helen Gavaghan to facilitate exploration of the notes and sources forming part of Something New Under the Sun, Satellites and the Beginning of the Space Age, by Helen Gavaghan (Copernicus/Springer-Verlag, New York). Book copyright Springer-Verlag. The ePage selector is available with simple modification of code for ePage selection of any work published by GavaghanCommunications on this or any other website. GavaghanCommunications does not and will not under any circumstances, even with letters of consent from the seeming copyright holder, knowingly publish material that is either in or out of copyright, that another publisher has previously published without that publisher's clear consent. This ePage selector is not available as a free download. An ePage selector appears on every page of the notes and sources. The terms and conditions appear only on this page.


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Page text content checked against original in print by HG on 1st May, 2013.

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